Learn more about Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

and the Impact of Trauma on People and Communities

Positive Childhood Experience (PCEs)

There is still more to learn about ACEs and how to prevent and reduce their effects. A person’s ACE score is not the whole story. Childhood experiences can be negative or positive. All childhood experiences matter. Positive Childhood Experiences (PCEs) help children and families cope with stress and recover from it.
PCEs in four areas of a child's life.  Self:  Feel capable of handling stressful situations, believe there is meaning and purpose for your life, accept changes and have a positive outlook, have an engaging hobby.  Home:  feel safe and protected by an adult in your home, have family that stood by you during difficult times, clean, safe home with enough food to eat, clear and predictable rules and routines.  School:  sufficient resources and academic experiences to learn, able to ask for help when needed, feel a sense of belonging in high school, supportive friend or group of friends.  Community:  enjoy participating in community traditions, have at least two non-parent adults who took genuine interest in you, involvement in sport, civic, faith-based, or positive activity group, regular opportunities to help others.

Meet the Instructors:

Rachel Jones, LPC

Missouri Department of Mental Health

Manager of Trauma Informed Care, Director of Disaster Response State Grant, Division of Behavioral Health
Rachel Jones, LPC

Angeline Stanislaus, MD

Missouri Department of Mental Health

Chief Medical Director
Angeline Stanislaus, MD

Beckie Gierer, MS

Missouri Department of Mental Health

Director of the Office of Disaster Services
Beckie Gierer, MS

Lauren Drummond Littrell

Chaplain at Mercy Health St. Louis

Founder and President of Love One Another Ministries
Lauren Drummond Littrell

This course was funded by a grant from SAMHSA, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The views and opinions contained in this course do not necessarily reflect those of SAMHSA or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and should not be construed as such. SAMHSA's mission is to reduce the impact of substance and mental illness on America's communities.


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